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Gabrielle Zevin

Gabrielle Zevin Author Photo image

Gabrielle Zevin is the New York Times and internationally best-selling author of several critically acclaimed novels, including The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry, which won the Southern California Independent Booksellers Award and the Japan Booksellers’ Award among other honors, and Young Jane Young, which won the South­ern Book Prize. Her novels have been translated into thirty-nine languages. She has also written books for young readers, including the award-winning Elsewhere. She lives in Los Angeles.
 
 
 
 

Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow cover image

Hudson's 2022 Book of the Year

Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow By Gabrielle Zevin

"This is a sad, hopeful, and funny book. It is a book about games, computer games in particular, building systems of interaction and valuation. But mostly what this book is about is friendship and what that can be and what that can become. It is a book about creative partnership, it is a book about love, it is a riveting story. Try it." -Matt, Los Angeles

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Gabrielle's Recommended Reads

Check out some of Gabrielle Zevin's favorite books and read why she loved them so much!

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Here
By Richard McGuire

Here was published in its current form eight years ago, but I only became aware of it in 2020. A beautiful and optimistic meditation on space and time. A perfect book to give. My partner keeps several copies around just in case we need to give one away.

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This Time Tomorrow
By Emma Straub

When I heard Emma Straub speak about this novel, she talked about writing it during the pandemic and said that she saw writing as a way to travel to places when she couldn’t travel. It’s something I’ve often thought myself. The book’s setting is partially 1990s New York, and the descriptions are palpable — John F. Kennedy, Jr. playing frisbee in Central Park! Pomander Court! Greasy pizza at V&T’s! Youth itself! No book made me cry more this year.

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Then We Came to the End
By Joshua Ferris

Few novels are about the family one makes at work. In the fifteen years since I first read it, I have often pulled Then We Came to the End off the shelf for inspiration. It’s incredibly funny (but never mean), moving, and masterfully employs the first-person plural POV, which is no small feat.

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Hidden Pictures cover image

Hidden Pictures
By Jason Rekulak

A recovering addict becomes a nanny for a kid who starts drawing disturbing pictures, and the novel is told partially through the kid’s pictures. Hidden Pictures is twisty, clever, and conceptually brilliant. The kind of book that I loved reading at fourteen and still love reading today.

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An American Marriage
By Tayari Jones

Tayari Jones is a terrific novelist. Smart on character, place, and concept. No words wasted.

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Our Missing Hearts
By Celeste Ng

Because it is a dystopia, people speak of this book as if it is a departure for Ng. I don’t think it is. There’s a clear progression from Everything I Never Told You, to Little Fires Everywhere, to Our Missing Hearts, and it’s fascinating to encounter her classic themes (the complicated nature of Asian American identities, the stories parents and children tell about and to each other, the difficulty of being a mother and a person) in a new form.

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The World According to Garp cover image

The World According to Garp
By John Irving

The quintessential John Irving novel. (I’ve read all of his novels except for the new one, The Last Chairlift, which I plan to read over the holidays.) When I think of the kind of novelist I wanted to be when I was nineteen years old, John Irving was it. He writes sprawling, emotional novels that are rich in character and have interesting things to say about what it’s like to be a human – humans, being both wonderful and awful. This novel has all the classic Irving features: New England, bears, boarding schools, single mothers, stints in European cities, writers, infidelity. But I think the grand theme of his novels is, perhaps, what it is to try to make sense of the world and one’s life through art. His novels make me feel as if I’ve gone somewhere and lived someone else’s life for a while. I’ll love John Irving forever.

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One Italian Summer
By Rebecca Serle

This novel is on Hudson’s Best of 2022 list, and I agree. What if you could be friends with your mother when you both were the same age? Serle’s books read lightly, but I think it’s her light touch that makes them so effective.

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More From Gabrielle Zevin

The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry cover image

The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry
By Gabrielle Zevin

A. J. Fikry’s life is not at all what he expected it to be. He lives alone, his bookstore is experiencing the worst sales in its history, and now his prized possession, a rare collection of Poe poems, has been stolen. But when a mysterious package appears at the bookstore, its unexpected arrival gives Fikry the chance to make his life over--and see everything anew.

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Elsewhere cover image

Elsewhere
By Gabrielle Zevin

Welcome to Elsewhere. It is warm, with a breeze, and the beaches are marvelous. It's quiet and peaceful. You can't get sick or any older. Curious to see new paintings by Picasso? Swing by one of Elsewhere's museums. Need to talk to someone about your problems? Stop by Marilyn Monroe's psychiatric practice. Elsewhere is where fifteen-year-old Liz Hall ends up, after she has died. It is a place so like Earth, yet completely different. Here Liz will age backward from the day of her death until she becomes a baby again and returns to Earth. But Liz wants to turn sixteen, not fourteen again. She wants to get her driver's license. She wants to graduate from high school and go to college. How can Liz let go of the only life she has ever known and embrace a new one?

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Young Jane Young
By Gabrielle Zevin

"Gabrielle Zevin checks so many thematic boxes with Young Jane Young: gender inequality, feminism, bullying, the morality of politics and truth, family dynamics, and more. It is completely of the moment and sadly ageless. Somehow she puts all of this together in a package that is weightless and entertaining. A great read with broad appeal." -Sara, Atlanta

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